May 26, 1959: When the Pirates’ Harvey Haddix was perfect for 12 innings, then lost


When discussing impressive baseball things that will never happen again, Harvey Haddix’s pitching performance on May 26, 1959, isn’t usually among the first things that come to mind. But it should be.

Fifty-eight years ago today, the Pirates’ lefty was perfect for 12 innings against the Braves, the defending National League champs, whose lineup included Hall of Famers Eddie Mathews and Hank Aaron. Think about that. A perfect game for 12 innings. Thirty-six up, thirty six down.

Equally noteworthy: The reason Haddix was still pitching in the 12th inning is because the Braves’ Lew Burdette had held the Pirates scoreless for 12 innings. A pitchers’ duel in the truest sense.

The Braves’ first base runner came in the top of the 13th, when Felix Mantilla reached on a error by Pirates third baseman Dan Hoak. Mathews then sacrificed Mantilla to second. Haddix then intentionally walked Aaron to set up a double play. A good strategy, of course, but baseball is often cruel. And cruel it was.

A Chicago fixture, Harrelson served as the White Sox general manager during the 1986 season before returning to broadcasting.

Known for his open on-air rooting for the White Sox, Harrelson’s signature call is reserved for home runs: You can put it on the board … yes!

Harrelson had some power during his playing days, hitting 35 homers for the Red Sox in 1968 — no small feat in the Year of the Pitcher — on the way to a third-place finish Basketball Jerseys For Sale in MVP voting. In all, he spent parts of nine seasons in the majors before retiring Cheap Authentic NFL Jerseys in 1971 at age 29.

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